Frequently Asked Questions

 

What is the location for the retreats?

The location of the retreats varies based on the retreat. Most retreats are held off campus, subject to the availability of venues.

Is there a stipend for facilitators or mentors?

Unfortunately, there is not a stipend.

What qualifications should a mentor have?

Mentors are typically undergraduate students who previously attended a retreat. A mentor should have some experience participating in conversations about race. Mentors should have reflected on their own racial and ethnic identities, how that identity intersects with other aspects of their identity, and how their identities relate to systems of power, privilege, and oppression.

What qualifications should a facilitator have?

Facilitators are typically faculty and staff of the university. Facilitators must have extensive experience participating in conversations about race. While general facilitation experience is helpful, talking about race in the US context is a specific skill set that one should possess. Also, mentors and facilitators should have reflected on their own racial and ethnic identities, how that identity intersects with other aspects of their identity, and how their identities relate to systems of power, privilege, and oppression.

Are there ways for faculty and staff to be involved other than facilitating?

Faculty and staff can help support the work of these retreats by promoting the events, encouraging students to attend, and engaging in dialogues about race with students.

Will there be a Racial Aikido retreat for faculty and staff?

There is no plan currently to lead a Racial Aikido retreat for faculty and staff.

If I can’t make it for the dates listed, will there be another opportunity?

Unfortunately, at this time, there is not a plan to offer the retreats more than once a year. However, we would like to know if there is sufficient interest in offering these retreats multiple times a year, so please contact the coordinator of these events [link to Brandi’s contact form].

I am a multiracial student; what retreat should I attend?

Multiracial students might benefit from any of the retreats. Some students have found it helpful to attend Racial Aikido or Examining White Identity and then explore their multiracial identity more deeply during the Multiracial Aikido retreat.

Do these retreats racially segregate students?

The Division of Student Affairs is dedicated to principles of equity and social justice, and as such, all of our events and programs are inclusive to all who are committed to transformative learning. The social justice retreats support social change at Oregon State University and promote a weekend long conversation about race and racism. The retreats are not required events; students can elect to attend any of the retreats.  However, the retreats are designed with particular audiences in mind.  

Do these retreats create guilt or shame about one’s white identity?

The Examining White Identity retreat focuses on White identity development in both personal and institutional contexts, while introducing strategies to help students understand their relationships to others, and provide students the skills to help build community among diverse communities.